The Adventures of a Geophysicist on Holiday

SUMO’s Dr John Gater recently ventured on holiday to the Mediterranean, a short break away from Yorkshire and Real Ale. Whilst wandering around the local archaeological remains John noticed the abundance of highly visible utility services. Features that would typically require specialised survey equipment to identify, were in plain sight. In many instances, they were actually above the ground.

Chalki

Below, we take a look at some of the photographs captured during John’s travels.

  Manhole covers   One of the few ironworks that John encountered during his journey; he decided not to carry out an inspection but guessed it was a water pipe.

Manhole covers

One of the few ironworks that John encountered during his journey; he decided not to carry out an inspection but guessed it was a water pipe.

  Sparks may fly   As John says: 'why dig up the path when you can just go over it?’.

Sparks may fly

As John says: 'why dig up the path when you can just go over it?’.

  Follow the ‘yellow brick road’   In this picture, a sewer pipe is ‘protected’ by some concrete which makes the course of the service pretty clear to follow; no excuses for digging through it by mistake!

Follow the ‘yellow brick road’

In this picture, a sewer pipe is ‘protected’ by some concrete which makes the course of the service pretty clear to follow; no excuses for digging through it by mistake!

  Stone roads   Not a Roman mosaic, but one of many roads surfaced with a checkerboard of smooth stone. The line of the inserted service pipe is clear for all to see.

Stone roads

Not a Roman mosaic, but one of many roads surfaced with a checkerboard of smooth stone. The line of the inserted service pipe is clear for all to see.

  A Labyrinth?   John’s conclusion: ‘Need I say more?’

A Labyrinth?

John’s conclusion: ‘Need I say more?’

Here in the UK, we need to employ sophisticated survey equipment for the location of utility services. Whether it’s the use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) equipment or alternative survey techniques for underground mapping; we think it looks much easier to find them in the Mediterranean!

What do you think about John’s photographs? leave your thoughts in the comments section below